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  • L. Credit Investigations (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This module discusses all phases of gathering credit information

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    One of the core functions of the credit department is credit investigations. The greater the effort made to gather information at the beginning of the buyer/seller relationship, the easier it may be to collect accounts later. This module discusses all phases of gathering credit information—from the legal right to do so to the reasons such investigations are important to setting up the process. Sound credit decisions can only be made on the basis of adequate information about a customer’s business, its financial condition, the character of the principals and other business matters.  

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • How to conform to the legal requirements and ethical principles of credit investigations.
    • The sources of direct credit investigations.
    • The sources of indirect credit investigations.
    • The importance of conducting credit investigations on existing accounts.
    • The sources of international credit investigations.
    1. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Credit Investigations
    2. Direct Credit Investigations
    3. Indirect Credit Investigations
    4. Investigating Existing Accounts

     

    Speaker Bio:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

  • M. Business Credit Fraud (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The objective of this module is to provide a description of those known circumstances that most frequently reveal the trail of fraud and help credit professionals identify the steps necessary to protect their firms from financial loss through credit risk.

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    Predatory individuals perpetrate crimes of theft against companies by manipulating credit terms through misleading statements or actions which can cause significant financial losses. The real-life cases discussed in this chapter have been distilled into a variety of situations, circumstances and occurrences that, when identified, most often result in financial losses involving credit. These fraud warning signs are intended to serve as primary clues that a fraud against a company may be in progress.

    The objective of this module is to provide a description of those known circumstances that most frequently reveal the trail of fraud and help credit professionals identify the steps necessary to protect their firms from financial loss through credit risk. 

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • Hallmarks of bust-out and same name scams.
    • Why unsolicited orders are suspect.
    • Why a large number of reference requests should be checked out.
    • How the credit professional can be used as a reference in a fraud.
    • Why unverifiable references, increased orders and unusual product mixes are suspect.
    • How to spot misrepresentations.
    • How to spot the warning signs of hidden ownership, the principle being unavailable, NSF and counterfeit checks.
    • How to spot financial irregularities.
    • What assets may be removed from a business.
    • How to spot identity theft. 
    1. Bust-Out and Same Name Scams
    2. Unsolicited Orders
    3. Unverifiable References
    4. Large Number of Reference Requests
    5. Being the Credit Reference in a Possible Fraud
    6. Increased Orders and Unusual Product Mixes
    7. Misrepresentations
    8. Undisclosed Changes in Ownership
    9. Unverifiable Backgrounds of Principles
    10. Hidden Ownership
    11. Principal Unavailable
    12. NSF Checks Received
    13. Counterfeit Checks Received
    14. Financial Statement Irregularities
    15. Assets Removed
    16. Identity Theft and Social Engineering
    17. Fraud on the Rise 

    Speaker Bio:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

  • N. Making Credit Decisions (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This module discusses approaches and decision factors associated with making credit decisions with speed, accuracy and efficiency.

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    The basic objective in making credit decisions is to find ways to approve an order with reasonable expectation that the customer will pay in accordance with established credit terms. A decision to grant or not to grant credit affects sales revenue, profit, production and procurement. If the customer is a good credit risk, the order may be approved as submitted. Otherwise, alternatives should be developed that are acceptable to the credit department and the sales department—and still meet the customer’s needs.

    It is desirable to establish routine procedures for making most credit decisions. Credit approval, through the use of order limits or overall credit limits, can streamline the workload in the credit department. The goal is to approve credit with minimum delay, provide customers with prompt service and control administrative costs. If routine orders can be processed quickly and efficiently, the credit professional has additional time to devote to more demanding credit matters. This module discusses approaches and decision factors associated with making credit decisions with speed, accuracy and efficiency. 

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • Approval of credit for new customers.
    • Establishing credit limits for customers.
    • Available security devices.
    • How credit scoring is used to help manage credit.
    • Credit approval for marginal credit accounts.
    • Making credit decisions using limited customer information.
    • Conducting review of credit limits.
    1. Accounts for New Customers
    2. Credit Availability and Limits for New/Existing/Repeat Customers
    3. Handling Marginal Business
    4. Decisions Based on Limited Information
    5. Review of Credit Limits

     

    Speaker Bio:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

  • Q. Negotiable Instruments (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module presents the Concept of Negotiability, Kinds of Negotiable Instruments, Certificates of Deposit, Negotiation of Commercial Paper, and Checks Marked

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    As commerce and trade developed, people moved beyond the reliance on barter to the use of money. Gradually, there was a need to use substitutes for money, such as commercial paper. Commercial paper is a contract for the payment of money. It can serve as a substitute for money payable immediately, such as a check, or it can be used as a means of extending credit. Commercial paper, consisting of notes and drafts, reflects the needs of merchants, traders and importers. These groups were responsible for the development of the negotiable instrument and the eventual creation of a set of rules for settling disputes in the courts they established for that purpose. These instrument’s rules became known as the law of negotiable instruments. 

    Gradually, the rules were codified and a uniform negotiable instruments act was passed by every state legislature. When the Uniform Commercial Code was drafted, Article 3 contained the statutory law that governs commercial paper. This Article (as enacted in different states) was in part superseded in 1987 when the U.S. Congress passed the Expedited Funds Availability Act, implemented by Availability Act Regulation CC of the Federal Reserve Board, which effectively superseded prior state laws. Article 3 of the UCC was then rewritten to comply with applicable federal laws and regulations and is now the principal source of law governing negotiable instruments.  

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • The concept of negotiability.
    • Various kinds of negotiable instruments.
    • The difference between special types of checks.
    • Certificates of deposit.
    • What a negotiation of commercial paper means.
    • Various types of endorsements.
    • What checks marked “Paid in Full” Mean.
    1. The Concept of Negotiability
    2. Kinds of Negotiable Instruments
    3. Certificates of Deposit
    4. Negotiation of Commercial Paper
    5. Checks Marked “Paid in Full”
    6. Check Writing Alternatives

     

    Speakers Bio:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

    Michael Williams is a graduate of Troy University with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.  Out of college, Michael served as a Captain for 7 years in the US Marines Corp, was a Marine pilot, an Aide to 2 commanding Generals, and is a proud Vietnam Veteran. He has served the NACM membership for over twenty years as Vice President of NACM Relations.  A familiar face within the NACM, Michael has partnered with NACM Members of all sizes to introduce creative solutions for third party efficiencies and system integrations. Michael is also a conference speaker, round table expert, and NACM certification curriculum contributor.

  • O. International Trade (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Companies selling internationally have a number of unique decisions to make before shipping an order.

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    Companies selling internationally have a number of unique decisions to make before shipping an order. The first of these will be based on an analysis regarding the country in which a seller is planning to do business. Once the country risk is understood, a credit decision can then be made on the customer placing the order. Consideration should be given to how the shipment will be billed and financed.

    The simplest way of extending credit is on open account, however, with this method comes the greatest risk. Other methods of payment include selling by means of various drafts, letters of credit and cash prior to delivery. All of these methods are used extensively in international trade and will be discussed later in this module. 

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • Country risk analysis versus international customer credit decisions.
    • Common problems for the exporter.
    • Different methods of international payment.
    • Letters of credit.
    • Commercial invoice.
    • Sight drafts.
    • Dated drafts.
    • Incoterms®.
    • The role of the freight forwarder.
    • Credit Insurance
    • Factoring and forfaiting.
    • The role of the freight forwarder.
    • Bankers acceptances.
    • Foreign exchange.
    1. International Credit Decisions
    2. International Methods of Payment
    3. International Shipping Terms
    4. Other Considerations
    5. Mitigating Risk with Trade Financing Options
    6. Collection Techniques

     

    Speaker Bio:
    The speakers for this module are Toni Drake and Val Venable. Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table, while Val has worked in various industries including automotive, aerospace, and the chemical industry for over 25 years. Toni and Val both hold a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. Toni and Val have also both attended and excelled at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further their education in the field of credit. Finally, Toni and Val continue to support the credit profession as speakers and instructors at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

  • P. Finance and Business Insurance (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This module explores the various choices available to borrowers, as well as alternative methods of financing.

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    Customers often borrow money as a means of financing their operations. These sources of financing such as banks, finance companies, factors and other institutional lenders, usually have first claim on a significant portion, if not all, of the customer’s assets by becoming a secured creditor through a filing under the Uniform Commercial Code. The customer’s reliance on the lender, and the lender’s superior collateral position, make it important for a grantor of unsecured trade credit to fully understand the relationships between the two parties. This module explores the various choices available to borrowers, as well as alternative methods of financing. 

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • The basic reasons for borrowing.
    • Types of loans and lines of credit from banks.
    • Different forms of leasing and leasing arrangements.
    • Aspects of leveraged buyouts and what a creditor should know about them.
    • How finance companies work and what a creditor should know about them.
    • Accounts receivable forecasting.
    • Types and features of trade credit insurance.
    • How a trade receivable put option can protect a single account.
    1. Financing Needs
    2. Banks
    3. U.S Small Business Administration
    4. Leasing
    5. Leveraged Buyouts
    6. Factors / Factoring
    7. Insurance
    8. Trade Receivable Put Options

     

    Speaker Bios:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

    Jay Tenney has been involved in credit for over 22 years. His first 10 years in credit he worked for the largest credit insurer in the world, and now works as a credit broker. Jay continues to support NACM as the Chairman of NACM Southwest and is a frequent speaker at NACM events. Jay has a BS in Agricultural Economics/Marketing from the University of Illinois. 

  • R. Bankruptcy Code Proceedings (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This chapter presents the general basics of bankruptcy. As with all legal issues, credit professionals are urged to seek legal counsel.

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    The term bankruptcy comes from Latin and means “broken bench.” Originally, when a merchant failed to repay suppliers in a timely manner, the suppliers would break the benches that displayed the goods of the merchant. With a broken bench, that merchant was unable to conduct business. Today, bankruptcy is far more complex and is governed by federal law. This chapter presents the general basics of bankruptcy. As with all legal issues, credit professionals are urged to seek legal counsel.   

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • The automatic stay provisions of the Bankruptcy Code.
    • Chapter 7, 11, 12 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code.
    • How to establish a response to bankruptcy filings.
    • How to pursue claims.
    • How the Office of the U.S. Trustee works.
    • The basic recovery procedure.
    1. Bankruptcy Code History and Summary
    2. Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure
    3. Chapter 7, 11, 12 and 13
    4. Establishing a Systematic Response to Bankruptcy Filings
    5. Objections to Proofs of Claims
    6. Reclamation
    7. 20-Day Administrative Claim
    8. Discharge and Dischargeability
    9. Pursuing Claims for False Financial Statement and Fraud
    10. Basic Recovery Procedure
    11. Preferences
    12. Fraudulent Transfers
    13. Involuntary Bankruptcy
    14. Strategy

     

    Speakers Bio:
    The speakers for this module are Toni Drake and Val Venable. Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table, while Val has worked in various industries including automotive, aerospace, and the chemical industry for over 25 years. Toni and Val both hold a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. Toni and Val have also both attended and excelled at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further their education in the field of credit. Finally, Toni and Val continue to support the credit profession as speakers and instructors at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

  • S. Bankruptcy Alternatives (part of Business Credit Principles)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    There are many ways of handling the affairs of insolvent or financially distressed business debtors. One is to keep the debtor in business and restore the business to profitability. Another is to put the debtor out of business, sell the assets and distribute the proceeds among creditors.

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    There are many ways of handling the affairs of insolvent or financially distressed business debtors. One is to keep the debtor in business and restore the business to profitability. Another is to put the debtor out of business, sell the assets and distribute the proceeds among creditors.

    Creditors usually prefer to rehabilitate a distressed debtor by voluntary out-of-court settlement. When rehabilitation is not possible they may liquidate assets outside of bankruptcy proceedings through a general assignment for the benefit of creditors. The credit professional that is familiar with both of these methods, and their advantages and disadvantages, will be able to participate effectively in whatever action is taken when a customer becomes insolvent.

    After viewing this module, students should understand: 

    Module Outline: 

    • How to identify a financially distressed debtor.
    • What is involved in a voluntary settlement of claims.
    • The different kinds of settlement plans.
    • The different methods of resolution.
    • The two types of assignments for the benefit of creditors.
    • How to evaluate settlement offers.
    1. Identifying the Distressed Customer
    2. Voluntary Settlements
    3. Methods of Resolution
    4. Assignment for the Benefit of Creditors
    5. Evaluating Settlement Offers

     

    Speaker Bios:
    Toni Drake brings over 30 years of oil and gas credit experience to the table. Toni holds a CCE, NACM’s most prestigious designation. After earning her CCE, she went on to attend and excel at NACM’s Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management to further her education in the field of credit. Toni continues to support the credit profession as a speaker and instructor at events like NACM’s annual Credit Congress.

    Abby Odneal started at NACM Southwest in a part-time summer position.  She liked it so much that 30 years later she is now the Chief Operating Officer.  Her long tenure at NACM has given her the opportunity to be actively engaged in all areas of NACM including Collections, Credit Reporting, Industry Groups, Education, and their Adjustments department. Abby also has a degree in accounting from the University of North Texas and is a Certified Association Executive. 

  • Advanced Credit Policy

    Contains 10 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This is an advanced course in the analysis and formulation of credit policy, including policies regarding credit investigation, terms of sale, credit-granting, and credit limits. It is intended for experienced people (typically Directors of Credit or similar positions) who must make and enforce credit policy. It is not an introductory course. The course textbook, "Making Sound Credit Policy Decisions" is included in your purchase and mailed to you.

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    This is an advanced course in the analysis and formulation of credit policy, including policies regarding credit investigation, terms of sale, credit-granting, and credit limits. It is intended for experienced people (typically Directors of Credit or similar positions) who must make and enforce credit policy.  It is not an introductory course.

    The basic text is Frederick C. Scherr, Making Sound Credit Policy Decisions, NACM, 1996, which will be mailed to you as a part of your course fee.  You should also have Principles of Business Credit, 8th Edition, as a reference. 

    The modules explain, discuss and expand on the material in the text.  Lectures are by Dr. Frederick C. Scherr, Professor of Finance (Emeritus), West Virginia University.

    Upon successful completion of this course participants earn 2 education points towards their CCE recertification.

    Speaker Bio:

    Dr. Frederick C. Scherr is a Professor Emeritus of Finance at the College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University, where he taught for 30 years and won both the College’s Outstanding Teacher and Outstanding Researcher awards.  He is the author of more than 30 research articles, four textbooks, and many articles in professional publications such as The Credit and Financial Management Review, The Credit Manager, and Business Credit.  He has done extensive work in adult education for the National Association of Credit Management, including teaching at the Graduate School of Credit and Financial Management, and for private corporations. 

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    = Basic          

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    = Intermediate         

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     = Advanced          

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    = Update

    The major topic in this module is making credit decisions. The reading assignment is chapters 1, 2, and 3 in Making Sound Credit Policy Decisions by Frederick C. Scherr. (This text is included in your registration.)  Topics covered include:  credit policy and the goals of the firm; costs that are affected by credit decisions; methods for evaluating the costs and benefits of credit decisions; determinants of credit investigation policy; credit-granting decisions in a marginal cost framework; how to estimate credit-based costs; the effects of uncertainty on credit-granting decisions; and factors that determine whether credit-granting should be based on long-term or short-term creditworthiness.  The case problem for this module is The Case of the Meritorious Molder, a case in credit-granting decisions, which is at the end of Chapter 3.

    The major topic for this module is the analysis of terms of sale.  The reading assignment is chapters 4, 6, and 7 in Making Sound Credit Policy Decisions by Frederick C. Scherr. (This text is included in your registration.)  Topics covered include: the effects of credit enhancements of the costs of credit-granting; taking credit cards as a collection strategy; basics of negotiating the conditions of credit-granting; expert and statistical scoring systems for credit-granting; legal aspects of terms of sale decisions; the costs and benefits of changing terms of sale; electronic payments; and cash discounts as a collection strategy.  The case problem for this module is The Case of the Tenuous Terms, a case in determining terms of sale, which is at the end of Chapter 7.

    The major topic for this module is monitoring the outcomes of credit policy.  The reading assignment is chapters 5, 9, and 8 in Making Sound Credit Policy Decisions by Frederick C. Scherr. (This text is included in your registration.) Topics covered include: information credit limits and credit investigation; risk credit limits and their application; outsourcing credit functions; credit management for the small firm; measurement error in monitoring credit outcomes; accurately measuring discount expense, days to pay, and bad debt expense; budgeting credit costs; and variance analysis of accounts receivable balances.  The case problem for this module is The Case of the Dubious DSO, a case in monitoring credit policy outcomes, which is at the end of Chapter 8.

  • Commercial Collections Specialist

    Contains 22 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This Specialty Certificate will present and explain the concept of the cost of credit.

    This Specialty Certificate will present and explain the concept of the cost of credit.  It will present the four basic costs of credit that businesses should consider when developing a credit policy which will aid in understanding why a customer doesn’t pay, and thus enable a business to prevent some of these situations.  It will also show how documenting the credit relationship is a vital part of the preparation for lending and how to get set up properly so that the right policies and procedures are in place to help ensure a good credit relationship with the customer.  It will also explain how to evaluate whether a company’s credit policies comply with the law.  Federal and state regulations govern the extension and enforcement of credit.  It will also cover the basics of how to make effective collection calls.

    The material in this collection of modules is designed for the beginning credit professional, with 0-3 years of credit experience.  Also please note, regulations vary from state to state; this presentation covers general concepts about state regulations.

    Module Levels are indicated as follows:

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    = Basic          

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     = Intermediate         

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      = Advanced          

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     = Update

    Basic Collection Training

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    This module provides the credit professional with an introduction to how to make an effective collection call.  Key information covered will include the importance of professionalism, how to prioritize and prepare for a call, details necessary for an effective call, the importance of documenting your calls, the importance of follow-up, and how to handle angry customers.  In addition this module will present role-plays of several collection calls.  After successful completion of this learning module the student will understand how to prioritize and plan for making a collection call, how to document and follow-up on collection calls, and how to handle angry customers.

    Speaker Bios:

    Mary Kunz, attended the University of Nebraska before beginning work in the field of credit for Gucci in California in 1984.  She went on to work for high tech and Fortune 500 companies such as Motorola, LSI Logic and Hewlett Packard.  She is currently a credit manager in Houston, Texas for Merchants Metals, a division of MMI Products, one of the largest manufacturers of fence systems in the nation.  Mary has been involved in NACM since 1989 and has actively participated in educational opportunities including International Credit and Advanced Financial Analysis.

    Janis Rowe, CCE,  has over 25 years experience in credit collections, working for both manufacturers and distributors, managing domestic and international business. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English and Psychology from Austin College 1982.  Janis has been very active in NACM and NACM-CFDD since joining in 1987, serving on various committees, as a local officer and on the National CFDD board.  Janis has worked for WESCO Distribution, a Fortune 500 electrical supply distributor, for over 12 years, starting as a Financial Services Supervisor and moving up to Region Financial Services Manager in 2005. She currently handles credit and collections and contract negotiation for four sales regions, totaling over $20 million in sales annually, with the assistance of 12 employees.

    Collections - Delinquencies and the Collection Process

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    It is critical to have a policy in place for implementing the management of credit accounts. , A credit policy that provides consistency in decision making and implementation will be helpful if it is necessary to deal with a delinquent account. , Topics covered in this learning module include Implementation of Policy, Examples of Collection Strategies and Steps, When to Use an Outside Source and Who to Use for an Outside Source. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand the cost of credit (the Payment Gap, the Red Zone, the cost of delinquency over time), how payment terms or contractual terms relate to delinquency and collections, the importance of having a collections procedure with increasing pressure at appropriate intervals, when to use outside sources for collections, who to use as an outside source of collections and the role of lawyers in collections.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in1981.

    Collections – Bankruptcy Overview

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    Bankruptcy is a federal statute, although there is some variation from state to state due to individual state laws. , This learning module presents an overview of the chapters of bankruptcy, giving more detail to Chapters 7 and 11. , Other topics covered include The Players and What They Want, Creditor Issues, Preferences and Proof of Claim. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand what each bankruptcy chapter is designed to address and how it functions, who is involved in a bankruptcy case, and what their roles are, the function of the means test, the role of the creditors committee, the order of distribution of assets in a Chapter 11, what a reclamation right is, what a preference is and when to file a proof of claim.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.

    Collections – Documenting the Credit Relationship

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    Documenting the credit relationship is a vital part of the preparation for lending. , Getting set up properly so that the right policies and procedures are in place can help ensure a good credit relationship with the customer. , This learning module presents Preparation, the Credit Policy Manual, Requirements for Credit Decisions and the Credit Agreement. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand why preparation is important, the importance of a credit policy manual and what should be included in it, the requirements for a credit decision, what a credit agreement is, what goes into it, and who should use one.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.

    Collections – Granting Credit: Regulatory Considerations

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    It is necessary when thinking about credit policy to evaluate whether a company’s credit policies comply with the law. , Federal and state regulations govern the extension and enforcement of credit. , , This learning module will present the topics of Customer and Guarantor Information, Collections, Federal Statutes and Regulations, and State Statutes and Regulations. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand the importance of safeguarding customer and guarantor information, what collection strategies are prohibited by the Federal Communications Commission, Federal law, State law, and postal laws, recording-keeping rules for merchants, the major federal statutes and regulations (ECOA, FCRA, Fair Credit Billing Act), and state statutes and regulations.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.

    Collections – Why Customer’s Don’t Pay

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    In order to better understand why customer’s sometimes don’t pay, it is helpful to understand the concept of the cost of credit. , There are four basic costs of credit that businesses should consider when developing a credit policy which will aid in understanding why a customer doesn’t pay, and thus enable a business to prevent some of these situations. , Topics covered in this learning module include The Costs of Credit, Reasons for Non Payment, “Real” Reasons for Non Payment, and Bad Intentions. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand what the four costs of credit are and how they impact a business, the concept of the Payment Gap, the concept of the Red Zone , the reasons that customers don’t pay and customers with bad intentions..

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in1981.

    Collections – Recovery, Litigation and the Courts

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    Compromise and settlements is the next step after delinquencies and the collection process. , It is the bridge between in-house collections and the litigation process. , This learning module covers Payment Plans, Litigation, Discovery, Motions, and Trials, and Judgment Enforcement. After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand when to consider negotiating a payment plan with a delinquent customer, reasonable terms for a payment plan with a delinquent customer, the risks of negotiating a payment plan with a delinquent customer, what “going legal” means, what an attorney will consider when filing a lawsuit, what happens if there is a dispute in a lawsuit, a creditor’s responsibility to provide a witness and issues involved in enforcement of a judgment.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in1981.