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  • Collections – Bankruptcy Overview

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module presents an overview of the chapters of bankruptcy, giving more detail to Chapters 7 and 11.

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    Bankruptcy is a federal statute, although there is some variation from state to state due to individual state laws. , This learning module presents an overview of the chapters of bankruptcy, giving more detail to Chapters 7 and 11. , Other topics covered include The Players and What They Want, Creditor Issues, Preferences and Proof of Claim. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand what each bankruptcy chapter is designed to address and how it functions, who is involved in a bankruptcy case, and what their roles are, the function of the means test, the role of the creditors committee, the order of distribution of assets in a Chapter 11, what a reclamation right is, what a preference is and when to file a proof of claim.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.


  • Collections – Delinquencies and the Collection Process

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Topics covered in this learning module include Implementation of Policy, Examples of Collection Strategies and Steps, When to Use an Outside Source and Who to Use for an Outside Source.

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    It is critical to have a policy in place for implementing the management of credit accounts. , A credit policy that provides consistency in decision making and implementation will be helpful if it is necessary to deal with a delinquent account. , Topics covered in this learning module include Implementation of Policy, Examples of Collection Strategies and Steps, When to Use an Outside Source and Who to Use for an Outside Source. , After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand the cost of credit (the Payment Gap, the Red Zone, the cost of delinquency over time), how payment terms or contractual terms relate to delinquency and collections, the importance of having a collections procedure with increasing pressure at appropriate intervals, when to use outside sources for collections, who to use as an outside source of collections and the role of lawyers in collections.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in1981.


  • Collections – Recovery, Litigation and the Courts

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module covers Payment Plans, Litigation, Discovery, Motions, and Trials, and Judgment Enforcement.

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    Compromise and settlements is the next step after delinquencies and the collection process. , It is the bridge between in-house collections and the litigation process. , This learning module covers Payment Plans, Litigation, Discovery, Motions, and Trials, and Judgment Enforcement. After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand when to consider negotiating a payment plan with a delinquent customer, reasonable terms for a payment plan with a delinquent customer, the risks of negotiating a payment plan with a delinquent customer, what “going legal” means, what an attorney will consider when filing a lawsuit, what happens if there is a dispute in a lawsuit, a creditor’s responsibility to provide a witness and issues involved in enforcement of a judgment.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in1981.


  • Bankruptcy – Setting the Stage

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module will provide a broad overview of bankruptcy to familiarize the student with the different chapters of bankruptcy and the parties involved

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    This learning module will provide a broad overview of bankruptcy to familiarize the student with the different chapters of bankruptcy and the parties involved Topics covered include the Chapters of Bankruptcy, the Players and What They Want, Special Unsecured Creditor Issues, Starting a Case, Exemptions, Avoidance Actions and Executory Contracts. After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand what the bankruptcy chapters are, what people are involved in a bankruptcy and what their roles are, issues regarding post petition credit, when and how to file proof of claim, the difference between voluntary and involuntary bankruptcy, rules regarding the automatic stay and what exemptions are and how they function.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.


  • Bankruptcy – Navigating the Chapters

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module discusses the major bankruptcy chapters in depth and describes how a creditor can deal with and work through the different chapters of bankruptcy.

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    This learning module discusses the major bankruptcy chapters in depth and describes how a creditor can deal with and work through the different chapters of bankruptcy. Topics include Chapter 7 – Liquidation, Chapter 13 – Wage Earners, Chapter 12 – Family Farmers, Chapter 9 – Municipal Reorganization, Chapter 15 – Ancillary and Cross Boarder, Chapter 11 – Reorganization, and Post Confirmation Problems. After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand what each bankruptcy chapter is designed to address and how it functions, who is involved in a bankruptcy case, and what their roles are, the function of the means test, the role of the creditors committee, the order of distribution of assets in a Chapter 11 and the absolute priority rule.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.


  • Bankruptcy – Exercising Your Rights as a Creditor

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This learning module will present the topics of Reclamation, Administrative Claims and Dealings with Bankruptcy.

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    In this learning module the credit professional will learn what rights he or she has as a creditor. The credit professional may recognize the term reclamation from state law concepts. Although reclamation is not specifically a bankruptcy concept it is implemented in bankruptcy. This module will present the topics of Reclamation, Administrative Claims and Dealings with Bankruptcy. After successful completion of this learning module the student should understand reclamation and how to exercise reclamation rights, the 20-day administrative claim (or 503(b)(9)) and how and when to file one, what a creditor should do when learning about a debtor’s bankruptcy, how to know when to file proof of claim, when a creditor is bound by an automatic stay, what a preference is and is not and why a creditor might force a debtor into bankruptcy.

    Speaker Bio:

    Robert S. Bernstein is managing partner of Bernstein Law Firm, P.C. , He serves as counsel to commercial landlords, equipment lessors, bankruptcy trustees, creditors' committees, creditors, and reorganizing businesses in proceedings throughout Pennsylvania and the Middle Atlantic States, concentrating in the many facets of bankruptcy and commercial law. , Mr. Bernstein writes and lectures for local and national groups on matters of collection, bankruptcy, business law, and professional ethics and, for more than ten years, has been certified as both a creditors' rights and business bankruptcy specialist by the American Board of Certification. , Mr. Bernstein earned a BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976 and a J.D. from Duquesne University in 1981.

  • Making Sense of Mechanic’s Liens, A Practical Introduction (Part of Commercial Construction Collections Specialist)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This is the first of a series of sessions designed for commercial credit executives in the building and construction arena.

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    This is the first of a series of sessions designed for commercial credit executives in the building and construction arena.  The first mechanic’s lien was filed in Maryland in 1791, and today mechanic’s liens remain a vital part of construction credit.  Topics covered in this module include The History Behind Mechanic’s Liens, Construction Credit Terminology, Justifying Extension of Credit, Lien Right Requirements, the Three Steps of the Mechanic’s Lien Process, Capturing Information, Managing State Statutes, Lien Foreclosure, and Public Construction.  After successful completion of this module the student will understand the unique nature of construction credit, the three lien rights requirements, when and why to file a preliminary notice, the three parts to the mechanic’s lien filing process (preliminary notice filing, mechanic’s lien filing and foreclosure), how to collect and use information, and the difference between dealing with a public or private entity.

  • CBF Review

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    CBF Review Part 1 and 2

    Part 1

    This module outlines what is covered on the CBF Exam.  Material covered includes the Legal Environment of Law:  Civil Law, Common Law, Constitutional Law, Statutory Law, Damages Available as Remedies, and Elements to Prove Negligence.  Contracts:  Definition of a Contract, Parole Evidence Rule, Conversion, Requirements of a Contract, Types of Contracts, Methods to Terminate a Contract, Transferring Rights Under a Contract, Discharge by Operation of Law, Methods to Settle a Legal Claim, Promissory Estoppel, Anticipatory Repudiation, Novation, E-Signature, and the Plain Meaning Rule.  Title and Risk of Loss:  The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), Contract for Sale of Goods, and Warranties and Product Liability. There is no quiz for this module.

    Part 2

    This module outlines what is covered on the CBF Exam.  Material covered includes Sale and Lease of Contracts:  Non-Conforming Goods Shipped, Lease, Sale, Shipment Contract, Destination Contract, Installment Contract, and Bill of Lading.  Negotiable Instruments:  Negotiable Instrument, Draft, Parties to a Draft, Accommodation Party, Third Party Beneficiary, Indorser, Types of Indorsements, Requirements for Negotiability, Check Collection Process, Holder, and Holder in Due Course.  Debtor-Creditor Relationships:  Surety, Guarantor, Garnishment, Lien, Execution and Levy, and Types of Liens (Mechanic’s, Artisan’s, Judicial).  Government Regulations:  Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Truth-in-Lending Act, Horizontal Restraints, Vertical Restraints, and Tying Agreements.  Business Organizations:  Partnership, General Partnership, Limited Liability Partnership, Limited Partnership, Syndicate, Joint Venture, Franchise, Business Trust, Elements of a Partnership, Partner by Estoppel, Corporations, S-Corporations, Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws, Stock Certificates, Preemptive Rights, Prospectus, Proxy, Dividends, and Violations of Corporate Director’s Duty of Loyalty. There is no quiz for this module. 

    Speaker Bio:

    Deborah L. Thorne, Esq. is a partner in the Chicago office of Barnes & Thornburg LLP. She serves as the Chicago Administrator for the Finance, Insolvency and Restructuring Department. Ms. Thorne concentrates her practice in the areas of creditors’ rights, bankruptcy, financial restructurings, secured lending, and commercial transactions.  Ms. Thorne received her B. A. degree in history from Macalester College in 1975, her M.A.T. degree from Duke University in 1976, and her J.D. with honors in 1983 from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago Kent College of Law.  Ms. Thorne is a frequent lecturer and has authored numerous articles for legal and business publications, including the National Association of Credit Management's Business Credit.

  • Anatomy of a Preference (Pre-2017 Version)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This module will present the steps the credit professional can take to build a strong defense against preference claims and minimize the cost of legal fees. Practicing good Credit Department Hygiene and knowing your customers and their payment patterns and how they align with the allowable defenses of a preference, can better the creditor's position for a strong defense.

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    What is worse than your customer filing for bankruptcy?  Having to give back the payments you collected in the three months before they filed.   The theory behind the preference sections of the bankruptcy code are sound - equal distribution to all.  In practice that is not how they are enforced.  Defending against the pursuit and recovery of alleged preferential payments could cost creditors more than their initial claim for the outstanding receivables when a customer initially seeks bankruptcy protection.

    This module will present the steps the credit professional can take to build a strong defense against preference claims and minimize the cost of legal fees.  Practicing good Credit Department Hygiene and knowing your customers and their payment patterns and how they align with the allowable defenses of a preference, can better the creditor's position for a strong defense.

    After successful completion of this module the student will understand the keys to a good defense against a preference claim, steps to take when a customer files bankruptcy, the elements of a preference, the Demand Letter, Statute of Limitations regarding preference claims, Contemporaneous Exchange, Ordinary Course of Business, and Subsequent New Value.

    Speaker Bio:

    Val Venable, CCE has been the America’s Credit Manager for SABIC Innovative Plastics, formerly GE Plastics, since 2000 with responsibilities for credit, collections and risk management in five countries. She manages a portfolio consisting of over 50,000 accounts with customers in just about every industry including automotive, consumer products, chemicals, net media and the industrial and construction arenas.  With over 25 years experience as a credit manager, Ms Venable has worked in the Aerospace, Steel and Metals and Marine industries, both domestic and international.  She has lead education sessions at the NACM Credit Congress and the Metals and Steel, and the Food Services Industry Day Groups and has addressed various CFDD Affiliates. 

  • Basic Collection Training

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This module provides the credit professional with an introduction to how to make an effective collection call. Key information covered will include the importance of professionalism, how to prioritize and prepare for a call, details necessary for an effective call, the importance of documenting your calls, the importance of follow-up, and how to handle angry customers. In addition this module will present role-plays of several collection calls.

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    This module provides the credit professional with an introduction to how to make an effective collection call.  Key information covered will include the importance of professionalism, how to prioritize and prepare for a call, details necessary for an effective call, the importance of documenting your calls, the importance of follow-up, and how to handle angry customers.  In addition this module will present role-plays of several collection calls.  After successful completion of this learning module the student will understand how to prioritize and plan for making a collection call, how to document and follow-up on collection calls, and how to handle angry customers.

    Speaker Bios:

    Mary Kunz, attended the University of Nebraska before beginning work in the field of credit for Gucci in California in 1984.  She went on to work for high tech and Fortune 500 companies such as Motorola, LSI Logic and Hewlett Packard.  She is currently a credit manager in Houston, Texas for Merchants Metals, a division of MMI Products, one of the largest manufacturers of fence systems in the nation.  Mary has been involved in NACM since 1989 and has actively participated in educational opportunities including International Credit and Advanced Financial Analysis.

    Janis Rowe, CCE,  has over 25 years experience in credit collections, working for both manufacturers and distributors, managing domestic and international business. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English and Psychology from Austin College 1982.  Janis has been very active in NACM and NACM-CFDD since joining in 1987, serving on various committees, as a local officer and on the National CFDD board.  Janis has worked for WESCO Distribution, a Fortune 500 electrical supply distributor, for over 12 years, starting as a Financial Services Supervisor and moving up to Region Financial Services Manager in 2005. She currently handles credit and collections and contract negotiation for four sales regions, totaling over $20 million in sales annually, with the assistance of 12 employees.